Disrupting Space: Placemaking and Augmented Reality
Aug 2017 30

One of the most transformative things about augmented reality and mixed reality are the abilities that it gives to add context and content to the world around us, to add layers of story and personal meaning to the hard architectures that often shapes our everyday experience of place.

For as long as we’ve known it, place (the city, the built environment, public infrastructure) is something that has been done to us, not with us. Mediated through semi-permanent hard architectures and public artforms that are chosen by knowledge institutions as ways to often preserve stories of power and ownership over historical narratives. The grafitti makers and flyposterers challenged this notion with non-permanent (and kind of non-linear) artforms, but the democratic potential of space and the built environment has largely been an un-disruptible thing.

This is what makes the augmentation of space so intriguing. In that it offers a kind of potential for a counter-architecture, one where we are active in the construction and co-creation of space as lived experience. Whilst locative and situated media artists have long been experimenting with these notions, the technologies have remained largely in the hands of specialists and therefore power regimes.

Just like the early internet (the one we currently inhabit btw) democratised information and connection, I believe that the notion of augmented reality offers a similar democratising potential for our notions of place. Imagine a city that you can experience through the eyes of someone else, or through a contextual layer that you choose, or a ‘non-place’ that suddenly is rich in story because of the democratising abilities of digital technologies over physical material ones such as buildings. Imagine being in another place within place. All rather exciting.

But this comes with many caveats. Just like disruptive (virtualised) information and screen technologies impacted on the very essence of how we understand what information and communications is, and brought with it many consequences in digital and real culture (fake news, trolling, trump, brexit, spam, social anxiety, surveillance) etc. So too will this disruption of hybrid physical space have a massive impact on our spatial culture. What that is precisely remains to be seen, but I sense and feel that it might be quite profound, scary and exciting.

With the coming onslaught of more intelligent forms of immersive technologies and spatial computing,  that understand the world in ways that increasingly resemble our own perceptual abilities, important questions about place are about to come into the fray. Who owns the right to this dataspace when it is increasingly attached to real place? Who owns my body space as I inhabit the public? How might the pervasive and rather imperialist ‘logic of silicon valley’ impact upon the way we inhabit, perceive and live through place? Will everything now just be one massive advertising canvas as envisioned by science fiction? Will we become even more atomised in our augmented filter bubbles?

Probably.

Mediating technologies, ones that we live through, are already hugely impacting our everyday experience of place. The current big shift of computing is to physical space (IoT, Smart Cities, open data etc etc are all part of this logic of computing that is launching from screens into things and bodies). Digital place, or as some now call it ‘Digital Reality’, is therefore the next cultural and disruptive battleground.

It will effect the inside of our homes, our cities, our countryside. Everything.

 

 

 

Here’s a little experiment made with #arkit and unity, playing with some ideas around augmented place.

“Underneath the paving slabs, the beach”

Virtual Reality and 360 Filmmaking for Medical and Health Training
Mar 2017 30

Working with Realspace and the Liverpool University, School of Medicine, I have recently been involved in developing a medical training resource using multiple 360 cameras, including a high end stereoscopic camera called the Nokia Ozo, to test out the benefits of immersive video training for doctors learning about working in high pressure environments.

The research challenge is to see how doctors deal with multiple information inputs and distractions whilst working and the scenarios that have been developed include diagnostics, emergencies as well as some of the practical and pastoral care issues that doctors face as they go about their practice.

We are then editing this into a VR app (for Samsung Gear Headsets) with a user interface, alongside supporting the development of a 360 interactive learning resource.

VR has a number of benefits for the training of health professionals, including providing cost effective simulations that really enable learners to experience a situation in context. Here’s a few pictures from the shoot…

Immersive Storytelling with Kafka in VR
Feb 2017 25

Have recently been working on a collaborative research project with folk from the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts, FACT Liverpool, LJMU, Kinicho and Manchester School of Art exploring fictional storytelling in 360/VR.

The aim of the project is to develop a prototype scene from Kafka’s novel ‘The Trial’ as a way to explore the medium specific aesthetics and logistics of making films in immersive environments. The team comes from a number of disciplines including filmmaking, theatre, storytelling, new media and sound. We are exploring a number of questions related to using sound, cinematography, editing, agency, embodiment and dramatic staging and performing in a uniquely VR way.

The camera has kindly been provided by the Creative Camera Company in Manchester

It’s a rather exciting time at the moment working with a medium where the conventions are unestablished, and going in a number of different directions, regarding how an audience member is positioned when they are in a film. It feels a bit like it must of felt 120 years ago.

Here’s some pics from the rehearsals at LIPA

Kafka – The Trial of Josef K- Behind the Scenes Timelapse from Peter Woodbridge on Vimeo.

IMG-20170405-WA000320170403_220722Screenshot_20170307-071303

 

Research Exploring Mixed Reality & Augmented Reality Storytelling and Digital Placemaking in the City
Nov 2016 30

I recently began my PhD research journey exploring mixed reality storytelling and digital placemaking in the smart city, as part of an AHRC Funded Collaborative Doctoral Award with McCann Manchester, the Virtual Engineering Centre and the Centre for Architecture and Visual Arts at Liverpool University.

My focus is looking at how immersive media technologies (such as mixed reality (AR/VR), internet of things, locative media, sensors and data) can be used to create imaginative interactions between people and place by connecting them to heritage and culture. My aim is to find ways to conceptualise and develop prototypes to make urban spaces more playful, imaginative & emotive through the use of mixed reality creative technologies and networked storytelling for visitors– which will hopefully be useful knowledge for future filmmakers, gamesmakers, advertisers, place marketers, placemakers, place hackers and urban designers.

The Practice-based PhD also involves a number of other collaborations within Arts, Culture organisations mainly in Manchester and Liverpool.

Beacons for Science – A Virtual and Augmented Reality App about Science in Manchester
Jul 2016 13

Over the past few months I have been collaborating with a number of partners on the ‘Beacons for Science’ project in Manchester, which is aiming to create an innovative app to experience Science in the City through Augmented and Virtual reality. Using beacon technology to enable people to experience science in new ways as they navigate the city.

My role has been to co-ordinate the development of the virtual reality and augmented story content, produced with the support of a number of cultural partners, artists, scientists and co-creators from around Manchester, and to work with the developers to shape the mixed reality user-experience.

There are a number of cool features in the app, including virtual reality experiences that are triggered when walking around Manchester as well as interactive augmented reality content that we created. There are about 15 experiences in total that were created as a result of a series of hack labs taking place in Manchester as part of the European City of Science calendar.

These include:

  • a Virtual Reality look at the Urban Bees that live on top of Manchester Art Gallery
  • augmented experiences in a number of the libraries around Manchester including Science Footage from the North West Film Archive and the Portico Library
  • a 360 degree performance about the life of Alan Turing
  • a 360 view from the top of the Hilton Hotel
  • an augmented reality experience on the Manchester #astrotram
  • a virtual reality film of the radio telescope at the Jodrell Bank Observatory
  • an augmented reality experiment inspired by John Dalton
  • a Brian Cox ‘Coxemon’ avatar hidden around manchester
  • a tour of the Manchester Ship canal
  • #astrotrams – where people can see augmented reality content of the galaxy on a tram that also includes announcements from Professor Brian Cox
  • a virtual statue of RSPB Founder Emily Williamson.

We have also been involved in a series of public engagement events to showcase the Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality content across Manchester during the Euroscience Open Forum 2016 Conference, that has brought over 4000 scientists to the city.

Download the app here:

Here’s a short showreel of some of the 360 content and some images from the project:

••coxemanjodrell bank***science three***science 2**science oneScreen Shot 2016-07-27 at 09.22.28urban beesjodrell bankship canal

 

 

Immersive Storylab – Exploring Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Transmedia Filmmaking
May 2016 11

“As connected devices and services continue to develop, filmmakers will be able to place a story layer over the real world. Inanimate objects and physical locations will become an opportunity to extend stories and engage audiences in ways that propel 21st-century storytelling.” Lance Weiler

This project is exploring the possibilities for transmedia, augmented and virtual reality storytelling by creating a number of experimental films that fuse filmmaking, digital environments and creative technologies. I am particularly interested in the way that these immersive environments create new forms of embodiment and can help us to experience geographical space in new ways.

Many people argue that VR can lead to highly empathetic and emotional kinds of storytelling experiences, which could have a number of applications for the social sciences, humanities and the arts. They therefore have really strong potential for storytellers addressing issues related to personal, cultural, social and behavioural change.

Filmmakers and storytellers who are working in this area are also having to rethink the way that they design ‘story architecture’ around non-linear forms of transmedia engagement. It is therefore an inter-disciplinary project that explores a range of areas such as the behavioural and cognitive sciences, user-experience design, immersive performance and transmedia storytelling.

We are currently developing a number of projects, campaigns and teaching initiatives with partners and organisations under this banner, so stay tuned for updates as they develop…

In the meantime, follow the Immersive Storylab on twitter for updates and links to work that we think is really exciting. Or get in touch with me to discuss a project via:  mail (at) petewoodbridge.info

 

Virtual Reality Filmmaking : Life in 360 Degrees
Apr 2016 03

I’ve been out and about the last few weeks getting my head around virtual reality 360 degree filmmaking for a few upcoming projects that I am developing. As part of my testing I’ve made this short video, called Virtual (anthropo) Reality , whilst out and about on the Wirral over the weekend.

I’m really excited at the moment by the potential of virtual and augmented reality as a highly empathetic storytelling medium, as well as enabling us to embed stortelling into the physical world. There’s a number of research projects currently happening around the world that show how VR/AR can contribute to peoples emotional and embodied understanding of other peoples experiences so this has enormous potential for those involved in the media, campaigning and communications industries.

Stay tuned for more updates as I develop some projects, but in the meantime please enjoy this short video…

Virtual (Anthropo)Reality from Peter Woodbridge on Vimeo.

After.Video Assemblages – a video book distributed via a Raspberry Pi
Feb 2016 28

After.video : Assemblages is a hybrid video book (paperback book and video) stored on a Raspberry Pi computer and packaged in a VHS case that assembles theory into practice.  It will be available here soon.

The project was demonstrated at this years Transmediale Festival and includes a ‘re-assembled version’ of my video essay on Control Societies.

Also available as online video and book PDF download.
Video and PDF – http://after.video/assemblages

ISBN: 978-1-906496-23-4, 2016, published by Open Humanities Press

aftervideo1

Theorising a World of Video

after.video realizes the world through moving images and reassembles theory after video. Extending the formats of ‘theory’, it reflects a new situation in which world and video have grown together.

This is an edited collection of assembled and annotated video essays living in two instantiations: an online version – located on the web at http://after.video/assemblages, and an offline version – stored on a server inside a VHS (Video Home System) case. This is both a digital and analog object: manifested, in a scholarly gesture, as a ‘video book’.

We hope that different tribes — from DIY hackercamps and medialabs, to unsatisfied academic visionaries, avantgarde-mesh-videographers and independent media collectives, even iTV and home-cinema addicted sofasurfers — will cherish this contribution to an ever more fragmented, ever more colorful spectrum of video-culture, consumption and appropriation…

Table of Contents

Control Societies 
Peter Woodbridge + Gary Hall + Clare Birchall
Scannable images: materialities of Post-Cinema after Video 
Karin + Shane Denson
Isistanbul 
Serhat Köksal
The Crying Selfie
Rózsa Zita Farkas
Guided Meditation 
Deborah Ligotrio
Contingent Feminist Tacticks for Working with Machines 
Lucia Egaña Rojas
Capturing the Ephemeral and Contestational 
Eric Kiuitenberg
Surveillance Assemblies 
Adnan Hadzi
You Spin me Round – Full Circle 
Andreas Treske

Editorial Collective

Oliver Lerone Schultz
Adnan Hadzi
Pablo de Soto
Laila Shereen Sakr (VJ Um Amel)

Tech Team

Jacob Friedman – Open Hypervideo Programmer
Anton Galanopoulos – Micro-Computer Programmer

Producers

Adnan Hadzi – OHP Managing Producer
Jacob Friedman – OHV Format Development & Interface Design
Joscha Jäger – OHV Format Development & Interface Design
Oliver Lerone Schultz – Coordination CDC, Video Vortex #9, OHP

Cover artwork and booklet design: Jacob Friedman
Copyright: the authors
Licence: after.video is dual licensed under the terms of the MIT license and the GPL3
http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.html
Language: English
Assembly On-demand
OpenMute Press

Acknowledgements

Co-Initiated + Funded by

Art + Civic Media as part of Centre for Digital Cultures @ Leuphana University.
Art + Civic Media was funded through Innovation Incubator, a major EU project financed by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the federal state of Lower Saxony.

Latitude Beta – an experimental transmedia feature film
Dec 2015 09


latitude titleLatitude is a satirical road trip film about two geeks who go on a treasure hunt to find the world’s ultimate technology, which they believe is hidden in a game called geocaching. It’s a bit of a metaphor, with the two lead characters being based on two very well known technology companies, and explores narratives of technological progress.

The film was made as a teaching project aimed at creating a low budget, and slightly critical, feature length film with undergraduate media production students. The script, funding and production was all conjured up over 4 months. It was produced across England, Wales and USA with a very small production team and tiny budget just to see if we could do it.

Well we did, kind of, here’s the film divided up into 12 chapters

Latitude Beta – Web Series

Peace,
Team Latitude :)

#secrecymachine
Oct 2015 23

In contemporary liberal democracies there is a polarisation between ideals of transparency – borne out in open government legislation, freedom of information, and confessionary culture – and what we might call a secret sphere, an institutionalised commitment to covert security operations that exist beyond the public view.

In the wake of the Snowden revelations about the surveillance capabilities of intelligence agencies around the globe, an interdisciplinary symposium at King’s College London** in 2015 gathered experts to discuss the place and implications of secrecy for contemporary cultural politics. Speakers addressed what was politically, ethically, socially and ontologically at stake in cultures of secrecy at the individual, national and international level.

Recordings from the event have been hidden across some of the darkest corners of the world wide web and will be revealed through a series of leaks and revelations.

#secrecymachine was a project of slow secretion, devised by Pete Woodbridge and Clare Birchall, to reveal the event’s secrets beyond the academy. It started on the 8th October 2015. Participants were exposed to a number of secret emails, each revealing codes and details for accessing content from the event.

All of the talks are now available and open to the public here http://immersivestorylab.com/secret/ 

Please share this secret with anyone you trust …

**’The Politics and Practices of Secrecy’ was a symposium organised by Clare Birchall & Matt Potolsky and funded by the Institute of North American Studies, King’s College London.

Digital Media BA – a new degree exploring the digital media landscape
Oct 2014 11

I’ve recently been working on the development of a BA (Hons) Degree in Digital Media at Coventry School of Art and Design. It’s a brand new degree exploring media design, storytelling, digital arts and digital culture.

Students will be working on convergent media projects in content production, moving-image, storytelling, speculative design and a number of related areas across the digital arts. Designed for learners who want to be hybrid-media artists, creative professionals and entrepreneurs in the increasing pervasive digital realm.

First year modules will explore digital culture, convergent multimedia production, digital publishing, storytelling and creative technology. The year will culminate in an intensive ‘creative hack lab’ project where students put their problem solving, innovation and design skills to the test with a live brief.

The second year will explore the creative and critical side of the digital arts, along with modules in digital advertising, transmedia storytelling and opportunities to undertake professional experience. There will also be options to develop skills in other areas of media production, including photography, experimental media and short film as well as opportunities to undertake visits with international partner organisations.

The final year will focus on critical digital research methods, exploring how to use creative technologies for research and the creation of new forms of knowledge, products and artistic expression. Students will then use their skills to develop a final research project, aimed at creating cutting-edge experiences and speculative possibilities for the future.

The degree is underpinned by an interdisciplinary approach to the design and analysis of digital culture and media, drawing on a range of methodologies from the digital and media arts, sciences, business and creative computing subject areas. It will be addressing the implications, challenges and possibilities of living in a world of disruptive innovation, peer 2 peer collaboration, connected devices, augmentation, pervasive storytelling, automation, big data and the internet of things and exploring this through projects that challenge and critique it.

Students will be involved in live projects, real industry and cultural briefs and working simulations that are informed by problem-based, activity-led and challenge-based learning methodologies. This will be supported by technology-enhanced learning approaches in a department that is internationally recognised for its innovative approach to learning design.

If you are interested in finding out about the degree please get in touch – you can find me on twitter and linked-in.

To find out more about the digital media research work in the Department of Media please visit the Centre for Disruptive Media website.

Culture Machine Live: Podcast Series
Oct 2013 28

Culture Machine Live is a podcast series dedicated to discussions of culture and theory.

Talks include….

Life After New Media: Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska

Post-Digital Print and Networks of Independent Publishing: Alessandro Ludovico

The Late Age of Print and the Future of Cultural Studies: Ted Striphas

The Politics of Transparency and Secrecy: Mark Fenster

Network Theory and Internet Politics: Geert Lovink

Cultural Criticism and the Digital Humanities: Alan Liu

and many more

Editors: Janneke Adema, Clare Birchall, Gary Hall and Pete Woodbridge.

For more information about the online, open access journal Culture Machine, visit www.culturemachine.net current utc time .

The Cine Collective – An Open Class Exploring the Art of Digital Cinematography
Dec 2012 18

Following on from our Open Class in Creative Activism, we’ve decided to think about how we can use some of the working practices we developed to explore other areas on our curriculum.

So this October we are launching the ‘Cine Collective‘- which is an Open Undergraduate Class exploring and experimenting with Digital Cinematography.

Over the course of 10 weeks we will be looking at a variety of approaches to studying, practicing and interrogating cinematography. Alongside this, the participants on the course will work on a series of cinematic responses to weekly creative briefs- that will contribute to form a showreel of work by the end of the class. Students are asked to openly post their response to each task to our community.

It’s an exciting time for ‘Open Teaching’ in Film, with a number of organisations and universities opening up their doors and helping to change the way that education is structured in the 21st Century. Surely it won’t be long until there is a very real prospect of undertaking a truly ‘distributed’ degree- choosing the best and most appropriate courses from around the world, to create some kind of educational playlist. There’s a lot of potential here for something truly digital, and radical, to emerge.  It’s really exciting to see projects such as the Peer 2 Peer UniversityCoursera, OERU and Mozilla’s Open Badges gaining momentum in this area- each taking a different approach and model to rethinking education.

In the meantime here are a few other open classes that you might want to explore next academic year….

Open Source Culture” taught by Mark Tribe (@marktribe on Twitter) Brown University

“Digital Storytelling -DS106” taught by Alan Levine et al (@cogdog on Twitter) University of Mary Washington

Guerilla Film Marketing” taught by Randy Finch (@randyfinch on Twitter) Florida State Uni

Building StoryWorlds: the art, craft and biz of storytelling in 21c” taught by Lance Weiler (@lanceweiler on Twitter) Columbia University

Digital Media and Participatory Culture” taught by Melanie E.S. Kohnen, Ph.D (@_mesk on Twitter) Georgia Tech

“The Language of Hollywood: Storytelling, Sound and Color” taught by Scott Higgins at Wesleyan University

The Camera Never Lies ” taught by Emmett Sullivan at Royal Holloway, London University

(List originally published by Sheri Candler on The Film Collaborative)

Living Books About Life
Oct 2012 28

Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life — with life understood both philosophically and biologically — which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. Produced by a globally-distributed network of writers and editors, the books in the series repackage existing open access science research by clustering it around selected topics whose unifying theme is life such as air, agriculture, bioethics, cosmetic surgery, electronic waste, energy, neurology and pharmacology.

By creating twenty one ‘living books about life’ in just seven months, the series represents an exciting new model for publishing, in a sustainable, low-cost manner, many more such books in the future. These books can be freely shared with other academic and non-academic institutions and individuals. Taken together, they constitute an engaging interdisciplinary resource for researching and teaching relevant science issues across the humanities, a resource that is capable of enhancing the intellectual and pedagogic experience of working with open access materials.

All the books in the series are themselves ‘living’, in the sense that they are open to ongoing collaborative processes of writing, editing, updating, remixing and commenting by readers. As well as repackaging open access science research — along with interactive maps, visualisations, podcasts and audio-visual material — into a series of books, Living Books About Life is thus engaged in rethinking ‘the book’ itself as a living, collaborative endeavour in the age of open science, open education, open data and e-book readers such as Kindle and the iPad. The book that I worked on, along with Janneke Adema, explored the way that concepts and ideas around the theme of Symbiosis can be applied to a number of areas within the (digital/networked) humanities.

Living Books About Life is a collaboration between Open Humanities Press and three academic institutions: Coventry University, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the University of Kent. Funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), and published by Open Humanities Press (OHP) (http://openhumanitiespress.org).  The Editors of the series are Clare Birchall (University of Kent), Gary Hall (Coventry University), Joanna Zylinska (Goldsmiths, University of London). Other members of the project team include Sigi Jőttkandt (Open Humanities Press), David Ottina (Open Humanities Press) and myself (Coventry University).

 

Creative Activism- A Free and Open Undergraduate Class exploring Media Activism #creativeactivism
Jan 2012 13

In January 2012 we launched our Free and Open Undergraduate class exploring Creative Activism– opening up the class, as much as we can, so others can participate, join the discussions and follow our lectures and podcasts.

The class explores the potentials of creative media activism through encouraging the creation of ‘live’ creative interventions that make a positive change.

Looking at how media activists and campaigners have used their media knowledge, creativity and community building skills to ask difficult questionsprovoke debate and raise awareness of important issues and problems in their local, national and international communities.

The class is supported by a range of collaborators and guest speakers who are changing the world. So far our participants include:

Emily James: Director of ‘Just Do It’- A Feature Documentary about Climate Change Activism  

John Jackson, Activist and Co-author of ‘Small Acts of Resistance: How Courage, Tenacity and Ingenuity Can Change the World

Joey Skaggs, A Prolific New York Based Artist, Culture Jammer and Prankster who uses the Media as his Canvas

James Cook, A Stand-up Comedian who explores what we can learn from Comedy and Satire as a means of Political and Cultural Activism

Sam Gregory, Programme Director and Human Rights Advocate at WITNESS, whose work addresses the importance of video and change

Professor Tessa Houghton, Assistant Professor in Media and Communications, University of Nottingham Malaysia who analyses Hacktivism and the Public Domain

Matt Mason, Author of Best-seller ‘The Pirate’s Dilemma’ and Executive Director of Marketing at Bittorent

Chris Jury, Activist, Broadcaster and Lecturer at Bath Spa University who presents a radio show called ‘Agitpop’- exploring the role of music and protest

Charles Tsai, Campaigner at the Creative Visions Foundation and Social Creatives- Organisations that encourage creative thinking to affect positive change

Ken Fero, Award Winning Radical Documentary Filmmaker – Whose work explores Power, Inequality and Injustice

John Mair, Broadcaster and Media Magnate- with expertise in News Media and Journalism

and many more.

By being run as an open community it will enable participants to constructively critique, learn from, build on and collaborate with each other to produce a body of work that will, hopefully, make a practical and positive mark on the world.

If you’d like to get involved, or just stay up to date with the work of this class, please contact me via twitter/facebook. You can also download the Creative Activism Podcasts in iTunes U – all are free to share, rip and remix

Other links

Creative Activism Facebook Community

Creative Activism- notes, tasks and podcasts in iTunes U

Creative Activism Twitterings

On the Streets of Ibadan
Nov 2011 06

Filmed as part of the Migration Aware project I have been working on in the City of Ibadan in Nigeria, Africa. More to follow soon.

How Progress is Made… Occupy London with words from Tony Benn #occupylsx
Nov 2011 04

Was checking out the camp and taking some shots yesterday outside St Pauls Cathedral and was fortunate enough to catch this inspiring speech by retired labour politician Tony Benn at #OccupyLSX during my break.

Rushed an edit together last night, let me know your thoughts, i didnt have a tripod so its a bit shaky. Song is called Mercury Fingerprint by Dan Skinner (from Audio Networks)

This was featured on Adbusters TV

Picturing the Body Open Course App Launched #PICBOD
Feb 2011 15

Over the past few months I have been working with Jonathan Worth and the Photography Team at Coventry University to develop an iPhone App for a free and open undergraduate course called ‘Picturing the Body’.

The ‘trendsetting’ app has been mentioned by the British Journal of PhotographyPDN Pulse, Times Higher Education and Professional Photographer Magazine. The innovative class, and the innovations associated with it, have been described by one of the teams collaborators as ‘an innovation in photography education’ and by Wired’s Rawfile team as ‘Blowing minds & shifting paradigms in photo education’.

The beta App allows people to engage with the community of practitioners and students who are taking part in the course. Pulling in photographs from Flickr, content from the blog, comments from Twitter as well as a range of photography podcasts from our iTunes U Project.

The intention is to see whether mobile applications can enhance the experience of being involved in the course and to help us to think about future developments in this area as part of our mantra for Open Media at Coventry University. Since the launch of this app, we have been involved in developing a number of innovations for mobile based learning, including the launch of the MediaPRO – Media Production Course App

To download the visit the PICBOD App in the iTunes Store and to find out more about the course please visit the PICBOD website.

(The image at the top and on my homepage – Crash Courtesy of Jonathan Shaw)

The Picbod App was developed as a part of my Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education. You can find the poster presentation of the PICBOD App here. Thanks to all the colleagues, students and other people who were involved in its development.

Ballad of the Manchester Ship Canal
Jul 2016 25

A poem by Sam Illingworth about the turbulent history of the Manchester Ship Canal. Narrated by Sam, James Redfern and Natasha Hall-McKenna, with audio recording help from Neil Cochrane.

The Ballad of the Manchester Ship Canal from Peter Woodbridge on Vimeo.

Created in collaboration with Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University, BBC R&D (who supplied the source footage that was re-conceived for this piece) and the Canal & Rivers Trust as part of the Beacons for Science Project with Salford University. Thanks also to Keith Myers for his support in developing this project.

You can also experience an immersive 360 degree version of this work by downloading the Beacons for Science Manchester app.